FAQ

The success rate of implants has been established to be between95-98 percent.

Relative Contraindications–some patients may have health or social factors that would not completely rule out implant surgery, but in the opinion of the dentist contribute to a poor long term prognosis. Such conditions may include heavy drinking and smoking, teeth grinding or not enough bone in the jaw. If these factors are addressed, then the patient becomes a suitable candidate.

Implant treatment plans may include filling decayed teeth and gum and/or bone surgery to improve any areas planned for implants. Otheroral conditions that might compromise the long-term success of the implants will also be addressed

Ask your dentist if your dental diagnosis would be appropriate for this type of implant

They are commonly used to better stabilize and retain lower dentures. They do not require the dentist to perform as much surgery as a regular sized implant and healing time can be less. Your dentist can determine if mini-implants are suitable in your case

Your dentist or dental hygienist may provide you with other special tooth cleaning tools. You will have invested a large amount of money and time in your implants; for them to last a lifetime, meticulous oral hygiene is required.

What do I Need to Know About Implants?

You will be investing a large amount of effort, money and time if you decide to get implants. You should gather as much information about implants as you can. Reading this FAQ is a good start. The internet also contains information about implants.

Be sure to get your information from trusted sites such as the American Dental Association, WebMD, or professional implant sites. Your dentist will also be a major source of information.

What is a dental implant?

Dental implants are shaped like a metal wood screws and are meant to replace the root of a missing tooth. They are typically made of titanium and manufactured by different companies, e.g.,Nobel Biocare, and Straumann and may be hollow or solid.

Implants like screws, serve the purpose of stabilizing, attaching and anchoring an object. These functions in the case of implants are in most cases served by threading the implant into a surgically drilled hole.

After healing, they will stabilize, anchor and support the extension which supports the final restoration. This extension is called an “abutment”. The abutment connects the implant “root” portion to the final restoration.

The success rate of implants has been establishedto bebetween95-98 percent.

Do implants Make Bone?

Implants do not make bone. Instead, a process known as “osteointegration” takes place. In this process the bone in your jaw bonds to the coating of the metal implant.

Mechanical retention also plays a part through the screwing action of the threads of the implant.

Can anybody have implants?

Adults in general good health are candidates for implants.

Since the jawbones of children are still growing, they are not usually considered as candidates for implants.

In the dental and medical world, there are two factors that must be considered before patients receive surgical procedures including dental implants.

      1. Absolute contraindications– some patients may have serious health problems which could keep them from receiving implants. Untreated heart disease, uncontrolled high blood pressure, uncontrolled periodontal disease etc., are some examples. However, if the patient receives treatment that brings the condition under control, they can be considered as suitable candidates for implants.
      2. Relative Contraindications–some patients may have health or social factors that would notcompletely rule out implant surgery, but in the opinion of the dentist contribute to a poor long term prognosis. Such conditions may include heavy drinking and smoking, teeth grinding or not enough bone in the jaw. If these factors are addressed, then the patient becomes a suitable candidate.

How Do I Know If I Am Suited for Implants?

Once it is determined that you have good general medical health, you will be scheduled for a dental exam and consultation.The dentist will exam your oral health status, take x-rays and impressions for making plaster models of your mouth. A final treatment plan will be formulated and presented to you for discussion and your consent for treatment.

Implant treatment plans may include filling decayed teeth and gum and/or bone surgery to improve any areas planned for implants. Otheroral conditionsthat might compromise the long-term successof the implants will also be addressed.

How Long Will Treatment Take?

In ideal cases for regular implants where no additional dental work is needed, treatment may take just a few weeks from the time of initial placement of the implant to the finished restoration. More complicated cases can take up to nine months.

How Long Will My Implants Last?

Your implants should last a lifetime with the proper care. When your implants are first placed, your mouth will be in excellent health. It is very important that you maintain that excellent health by practicing exacting oral hygiene practices.

Because dental implants are made from metal they don’t decay, but they are still susceptible to periodontal (gum) disease. Poor oral hygiene will result in a shorter overall prognosis of your implants.

Like your teeth, dental implants will require routine maintenance and occasional repair. Twice yearly checkups will ensure the best long-term results.

Can Implants Support MultipleReplacement Teeth?

Twenty-eight teeth can be supported by the appropriate number of implants. Twenty-eight is the number of teeth found in the upper and lower dental arches without counting the third molars (wisdom teeth).

Each missing natural tooth does not require its own implant. With good bone quality and other favorable factors, implants can be used by dentists in the same manner as natural teeth. This allows for implants to support multiple replacement teeth using short or long span bridges.

It is possible in cases where all the teeth are missing to construct a full complement of teeth supported by implants. This is referred to as full-mouth reconstruction or rehabilitation.

What Are the Steps in the Implant Process?

      1. Medical clearance
      2. Dental diagnosis and treatment plan with exam, x-rays and study models
      3. Correction of any pre-implant dental problems
      4. Surgical placement of the implants
      5. Integration (formation and growth) of bone with the implants
      6. Placement of final restorations (Crowns, bridges or dentures)
      7. Regular dental checkups
      8. Impeccable oral hygiene

After the Implant Surgery, Will I Be in Pain?

There will be some discomfort after surgery. The most common symptoms postoperatively are pain and swelling.

Symptoms are generally related to the length and complexity of the implant surgery. Long procedures may result in soreness of the jaw and corners of the mouth.

Your dentist will advise you of the most likely extent of any post-surgery symptoms you might expect in your unique case and provide you with the proper written postoperative instructions including any prescriptions you might require for pain.

Will I Get My Implants and New Teeth the Same Day?

In some cases, you will be able to get your implants and “provisional” or temporary teeth the same day. These are called immediate load implants.

Ask your dentist if your dental diagnosiswould be appropriate for this type of implant.

Can I Have Dental Implants Next to My Natural Teeth?

Yes, occasionally a very curved natural tooth root may interfere with implant placement, but aside from these rare instances implants are routinely placed next to natural teeth.

How are the Final Dental Crowns Attached to the Implants?

Crowns are attached to the implant abutments by using screws or dental cement.

What are “All on 4” Implants?

If a person has lost all their teeth, then an implant procedure called ‘All on 4” may be considered. Once it is determined that there is good boney support, 4 implants are surgical placed in the lower and/or upper jaw.

Two of the implants are placed toward the front and two toward the back of the jaw. The back implants slant toward the back of the mouth.

Temporary (provisional) replacement teeth are placed, the area allowed to heal for 6 to 8 months, permanent restorations are fabricated, provisional teeth removed and the permanent teeth restorations are put in place.

What are Mini-Implants?

Mini-implants as the name suggests, are smaller versions of regular size implants. They are used where there might not be enough vertical height or horizontal width bone area for a regular sized implant. They are generally less expensive.

They are commonlyused to better stabilize and retain lower dentures. They do not require the dentist to perform as much surgery as a regular sized implant and healing time can be less. Your dentist can determine if mini-implants are suitable in your case.

How Many Appointments Will I Need for My Implants?

Once any pre-implant procedures have been completed, i.e., fillings, gum surgery, etc., the number of appointments for regular implants will vary with your case and the dentist’s preferences. Types of appointments may include.

      1. Exam, diagnosis, x-rays consultation
      2. Impression and other dental records taken
      3. Surgical placement of the implants and placement of temporary teeth
      4. After healing, gingival (gum) caps may be placed to better form the gum tissue around the implants
      5. After another appropriate healing period the permanent teeth are placed
      6. A follow up appointment

After final implant placement,it is very important that you schedule twice yearly checkups and maintain excellent oral hygiene.

Will I Be Able to Eat Normally with My Teeth?

Temporary teeth will require eating with some care. You may be provided with a special diet to avoid placing undo force on the implant(s).

Once the permanent teeth are attached, you may eat normally as you did with your natural teeth.

How Do I Take Care of My Implants?

It has been shown that the biggest reason for the failure of dental implants is periodontal (gum) disease. Proper home care can help prevent problems.

Caring for your implants is essentially like caring for your natural teeth. You will need to brush and floss your teeth twice a day and if possible after every time you eat.

Your dentist or dental hygienist may provide you with other special tooth cleaning tools. You will have invested a large amount of money and time in your implants;for them to last a lifetime, meticulous oral hygiene is required.